Monday, 20 November 2017

Rumble in the Jungle Part II

The "Rumble in le Jungle" at ECTRIMS2017 turned into a "Bumble in the Immunological jungle" as the Heavyweight clash turned into a love-fest. 

Sunday, 19 November 2017

Have you been involved in shared-decision making?

A recent study published in the British Medical Journal (BMJ) proposes a simple three talk model for shared-decision making in the clinic. 

Have you been involved in a shared-decision making process, or have you simply been told what is best for you? 

Please have your say.


Saturday, 18 November 2017

The good, the bands, and the ugly: do oligoclonal bands mean more brain shrinkage?


Oligoclonal bands (OCBs) are now back in the diagnostic criteria for MS - they can be used to support a diagnosis. If someone has a clinically-isolated syndrome - an episode of symptoms or signs due to demyelination without any evidence of previous events - the presence of OCBs makes it much more likely that they will go on to develop clinically-definite MS

Friday, 17 November 2017

Guest Post: Self-catheterisation

Note: This is a no-nonsense and detailed post on self-catheterisation.

As MS progresses we often have to self-catheterise. This presents few problems for some. Others, like me, aren’t so lucky.



Thursday, 16 November 2017

Latest natalizumab PML risk update

The latest PML risk figures from Biogen. If you are on natalizumab and are JCV seropositive this post is for you.

Why does smoking increase your risk of MS?

We don’t understand yet why people get MS. The accepted view is that there is an interaction between risk genes and environmental factors like EBV, smoking, and vitamin D status. Epidemiological studies have helped to identify these risk factors for developing MS, but it is unclear how these factors actually contribute to disease evolution and progression.




Wednesday, 15 November 2017

LDN does not affect MS

"Low dose naltrexone (LDN) has become a popular off-label therapy for multiple sclerosis (MS). A few small, randomized studies indicate that LDN may have beneficial effects in MS and other autoimmune diseases. If proven efficacious, it would be a cheap and safe alternative to the expensive treatments currently recommended for MS. We investigated whether a sudden increase in LDN use in Norway in 2013 was followed by changes in dispensing of other medications used to treat MS."

Tuesday, 14 November 2017

HSCT in MS - what have we learnt?

More and more HSCT procedures (aka bone marrow transplants) are being performed for MS around the world than ever before. Currently, we lack convincing data on the conditioning regimen that best balances efficacy and safety. Patient selection is key and HSCT should be considered as an early option in aggressive cases of inflammatory MS, rather than as salvage therapy in later disease. 


Monday, 13 November 2017

Translocator protein: useful to see, useful to target?

Translocator protein (TSPO) is found on the outer mitochondrial membrane (in other words, on the outside of the powerhouse of the cell). It is thought to be involved in regulation of several cellular processes but its actual function is still up for debate. 


Sunday, 12 November 2017

Seizures, epilepsy, and MS

Any type of injury to the brain - whether focal or diffuse - can increase your risk of developing epileptic seizures. pwMS who have lots of lesions or significant atrophy are probably more at risk of developing epilepsy. The exact risk of epilepsy in MS has been a bit variable in reported studies. Because the absolute numbers of pwMS who also develop epilepsy is quite low, you need a really big cohort to see if there is any increased risk compared to people without MS.