Wednesday, 28 December 2011

Kick-Boxing

Jackson et al. Feasibility and effects of a group kickboxing program for individuals with multiple sclerosis: A pilot report. J Bodyw Mov Ther. 2012 Jan;16(1):7-13.

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Balance and mobility impairments are common in MS'ers. The primary purpose of this pilot program was to evaluate the feasibility and the effects of group kickboxing on balance and mobility in individuals with MS.

METHODS: Four individuals with relapsing-remitting or secondary progressive MS participated in a group kickboxing program two times per week for 8 weeks. Outcome measures included the Berg Balance Scale (BBS), Dynamic Gait Index (DGI), Timed Up and Go (TUG), walking speed and the Activities Specific Balance Confidence Scale (ABC).



RESULTS: Following training, 3 of 4 participants had improvements in BBS performance. All participants demonstrated improvements in the DGI. Changes in the TUG, ABC, and walking speed were more variable.

CONCLUSION: Group kickboxing appears to be a feasible exercise activity for individuals with MS and may lead to improvement in select measures of balance. Further investigation is warranted.

"The creativity of the research community never ceases to amaze me. I have seen similar work done using software and hardware available on the Wii, PSP3 and XBox360. The message is exercise, particularly if it challenges your balance centres, is good for you. Before embarking on any activity please get professional advice from your physiotherapist."

3 comments:

  1. Hi,

    This sounds a bit like a case of 'use it or lose it' While kick boxing is possibly an extreme example the principle of pushing yourself to the limit of your capability and a bit beyond is essential

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  2. Exercise is not easy to fit in - not enough time and energy. As the Mouse Doctor's post said, everything takes longer to do. Add to that a greater need for rest and sleep.

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  3. Re: "Exercise is not easy to fit in - not enough time and energy. As the Mouse Doctor's post said, everything takes longer to do. Add to that a greater need for rest and sleep."

    I agree; I have the same problem and classify myself as being normal. The problem is de-conditioning is a vicious cycle; the less exercise you do the more tired you feel. Although exercise requires effort and energy, in moderation, it also increases your energy levels; ask anyone who exercises regularly. In addition, exercise has numerous other effects on the body and brain that may be beneficial to someone with MS (see previous posts on this blog re exercise).

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