Sunday, 29 January 2012

January. Unrelated Blogger Comments 4

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15 comments:

  1. Question: Does inflammation ever show up in affected areas of MS patients? Is non-brain inflammation at all associated with an MS relapse?

    Background: I am in the early stages of RRMS. I have had about 4 relapses so far, maybe 5. During a relapse, my hands get puffy, more on the right hand, which is more affected. This is measured visually. I can normally see the tiny wrinkles in the back of my hand. When I'm having a relapse, I can't see the natural wrinkles on my hand or fingers. It's like the hand is very slightly inflated. My hand and fingers are visibly puffier and when I bend my hand back to create wrinkles at the wrist the nature of the wrinkles created is different than normal. Even my mom noticed inflammation in my hands when I was diagnosed.

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  2. I see that neuros have been given the go ahead to prescribe rebif after a CIS to try and prevent full blown MS. Has anyone looked into giving very large doses of vit D3 to do the same thing?

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  3. Matt, inflammation means something is red and raw. I've never heard of external inflammation with MS.
    What you describe sounds like swelling after steroids.

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  4. "I see that neuros have been given the go ahead to prescribe rebif after a CIS to try and prevent full blown MS. Has anyone looked into giving very large doses of vit D3 to do the same thing?"

    The idea about high doses of vitamin D is in many peoples thoughts and I am sure that people will be trying to get these studies ofthe ground.

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  5. MS can strike people at any age, though it is most likely to affect men and women in their 20s and 30s. Why do you think this is? I thought that people in this age range were better equiped to fight illness. I always thought that diseases usually happen in babies and old people, not those in the prime of their lives.

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  6. Prof G - what are your chances of doing well in this year's London marathon? Are you more confident than last year?

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  7. Related to the question from Anonymous 12.08 - At what age can you feel that I'm probably safe now? (too old to get MS)

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  8. Re: "MS can strike people at any age, though it is most likely to affect men and women in their 20s and 30s. Why do you think this is? I thought that people in this age range were better equiped to fight illness. I always thought that diseases usually happen in babies and old people, not those in the prime of their lives."

    Not true; only some diseases target the young and the old. I wish we knew why MS affected young adults; the answer may help us get to the bottom of the problem of causation.

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  9. Re: "I see that neuros have been given the go ahead to prescribe rebif after a CIS to try and prevent full blown MS. Has anyone looked into giving very large doses of vit D3 to do the same thing?"

    There are currently several vD intervention studies underway or in the process of being planned. Please see earlier post:

    http://multiple-sclerosis-research.blogspot.com/2011/11/vitamin-d-and-ms-trial-activity.html

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  10. Re: "Prof G - what are your chances of doing well in this year's London marathon? Are you more confident than last year?"

    Last year I was insane; broken clavicle and ribs. If I can shed 20kg I may get close to 3hrs 10mins; however, in my current state 3hrs 30min is more realistic. The problem I am having is carving out time to train in the week.

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  11. Re: "Related to the question from Anonymous 12.08 - At what age can you feel that I'm probably safe now? (too old to get MS)"

    You can never really be safe, but your risk plummets after 40 and in particular 50. Saying that I diagnosed a man with PPMS a year ago; he presented with his first symptoms when he was 55 years old.

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  12. Re: "The London Marathon."

    I feel a lot older that when I trained for and completed the London marathon in 1995 (sub-3-hour in 2:56).

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  13. Re: "Question: Does inflammation ever show up in affected areas of MS patients? Is non-brain inflammation at all associated with an MS relapse?"

    Subtle signs of inflammation can be detected in the blood of MS'ers. These are referred to as inflammatory markers. As far as your skin goes this is not something I have seen before. Any chance that you have had steroids? If yes, this could cause that problem.

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  14. In your efforts to slow down MS progression, you’re trailing Ocrelizumab, right?

    But Ocrelizumab is basically an immunosuppressive drug that caused due to excess deaths due to opportunistic infections in clinical trials in rheumatoid arthritis and lupus erythematosus. Why are you more willing to test the drug in MS patients when the dangers are very apparent?

    Furthermore, Ocrelizumab is a anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody that targets mature B lymphocytes. In what way does Ocrelizumab have nerve protective properties?

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  15. Dear Anon 11:52 see post in the first Feburary unrelated blooger post

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