Monday, 27 February 2012

Feb 3: Unrelated blogger comments

Sometimes You want to post a comment that is Unrelated to the thread.

Therefore I have Created this Spot for You
It jumps around so that it is visible

6 comments:

  1. I have a question:

    Why in MS is myelin and oligodendrocytes the target? What causes them to be susceptible to attack? How come the microphage, T and B cells, etc don’t attack anything else in the brain and spinal cord? Why is the disease so specific?

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  2. If depends on who you talk to for the answer.

    Some will say it is a virus that infects oligodendrocytes that triggers the response

    Others will say that oligodendrocytes are more susceptible to damage than other cells

    others will say that there is something special about how myelin reactive cells avoid immunological tolerance. The immune system normal deletes self-damaging immune cells fromits repertoire

    others will say it is not myelin but the heat shock protein that they express when they are stressed (by an infection?)

    Others will say that they express target molecules for destructive immune responses that other cells do not

    Some will say that they are not the target!

    Once disease starts I am sure that the immune response does attack other things in the nervous system
    and certainly includes nerve proteins, and node of ranvier proteins and astrocyte proteins etc.

    However it is clear that oligodendrocytes are a target and what causes this damage must be near by....unless others say it is a genetic problem


    I know this does not help..but there are many unknowns.

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  3. I was reading on MSRC today an article from nature neuroscience dated 26.2.12 which said that the neurodegenerative hypothesis for the causes of MS is obsolete and researchers should be looking at the immune system and not the CNS. Have you any comments?

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  4. Gavin Giovannoni has previously said that MSers struggle with walking because: "Walking is a complex motor task and requires input from several neuronal systems that are all affected by MS; joint position (sensory), coordination (cerebellum), the motor system and inhibitory circuits in the spinal cord. Therefore walking difficulties are an integrator of a lot of systems."

    Why is it then I know so many thick people who can manage it better than me? (Please don't say it's because I'm thicker than what those people.)

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  5. "Thickness" is controlled by a different bit of the brain that is not involved controlling in the complex motor tasks using in walking

    Otherwise footballers would be the brains of Britain.

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  6. "I was reading on MSRC today....Have you any comments?"

    Please see post

    ReplyDelete

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