Tuesday, 27 November 2012

Unrelated Blogger Comments November

Sometimes you what to say something that is unrelated to the threads. This is a spot for You. Previous comments can be got at on the posts on the right of the main page.


40 comments:

  1. MD 1&2,

    I hope you aren't keeping your charges in the basement:
    http://www.slate.com/articles/health_and_science/science/2012/11/animals_drowned_in_sandy_nyu_medical_research_is_set_back_years_by_dead.html

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Nope...but we have the Thames barrier to save us from floods and maybe we may have predicted flooding, giving closing of the underground and moved them.

      However this was a sad event

      Delete
  2. Alemtuzumab has been associated with infusion-related events including hypotension, rigors, fever, shortness of breath, bronchospasm, chills, and/or rash. In post-marketing reports, the following serious infusion-related events were reported: syncope, pulmonary infiltrates, ARDS, respiratory arrest, cardiac arrhythmias, myocardial infarction and cardiac arrest. The cardiac adverse events have resulted in death in some cases. This DRUG is VERY dangerous AND BEING PROMOTED
    THIS IS EVEN SADDER

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. As with all things you have to balance the risks with potential benefits.

      Here are some more drug side effects (from drugs.com). Just imagine, anybody can buy these dangerous drugs without a prescription!

      ASSOCIATED WITH PARACETAMOL (ACETAMINOPHEN)
      nausea; jaundice; rare cases of thrombocytopenia; erythematous skin rashes; bullous erythema and purpura fulminans; muscle spasms and trismus

      ASSOCIATED WITH ASPIRIN:
      Endoscopically identifiable gastric mucosal lesions occur in most patients who receive a single dose of aspirin; hemorrhage, peptic ulcers, perforation, small bowel enteropathy, and esophageal ulcerations; acute renal failure in rare instances; increased blood fibrinolytic activity; hypoprothrombinemia, thrombocytopenia, thrombocyturia, megaloblastic anemia, and pancytopenia have been reported rarely. Aplastic anemia and eosinophilia have also been reported; bronchospasm, rhinitis, conjunctivitis, urticaria, angioedema, and anaphylaxis; Stevens-Johnson syndrome; Respiratory alkalosis and metabolic acidosis; salicylate-induced variant angina, ventricular ectopy, conduction abnormalities, and hypotension; cerebral edema, coma, confusion, dizziness, headache, cranial hemorrhage, lethargy and seizures; rhabdomyolysis; hyperpnea, pulmonary edema, and tachypnea; localized periorbital edema

      ASSOCIATED WITH BENADRYL (DIPHENHYDRAMINE):
      depression with drowsiness and sedation in nearly all patients treated; dizziness, mental confusion, rigidity, lip and tongue protrusion, trismus, torticollis, and swallowing difficulties; rash, pruritus and eczema; hypotension, tachycardia, and palpitations; blurred vision, diplopia, and dry eyes; urinary retention and dysuria;

      Delete
    2. The original post is trolling, I have not spammed this out of respect for Anon above who makes the point to a troll..stop it

      Delete
  3. I've registered for the 4th MS Day, given eventbrite all my details, and now they've sent me out a ticket. The ticket asks me to complete the eventbrite form at http://msday.co.uk. The only form to fill in is to register for tickets. If I fill in this form presumably I'll be sent out another ticket asking me to fill in an eventbrite form- to infinity and beyond. Is this a mistake or am I missing something?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Please use this URL: http://msday.eventbrite.co.uk/

      Delete
  4. "Relapses are triggered by white blood cells entering the brain and damaging the oligodendrocyte (0) and nerves (N)."

    Oligodendrocytes are already dead when white blood cells enter the brain. Please update.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Have updated some links but are they already dead and gone?

      http://multiple-sclerosis-research.blogspot.co.uk/2012/01/what-is-your-story.html

      Maybe remove links to comments...Please Update:-)

      Delete
  5. Have you seen what Prof Franklin has been up to? Some repair for spinal cord injury in dogs. I like what he's doing and the stuff going on at Cambridge. This gives me some hope of some repair int eh future.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Have seen it on the telepages, I have had a quick look on the brain web site but did not see the paper yet. Sometimes the media post before the paper is visible.

      Delete
  6. Heard that on the Today program this morning.

    ReplyDelete
  7. phys dot org/news/2012-11-nanoparticle-halts-multiple-sclerosis-diabetes.html#nwlt

    Microparticles bearing encephalitogenic peptides induce T-cell tolerance and ameliorate experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis,
    Nature Biotechnology (2012) doi:10.1038/nbt.2434,
    www.nature.com/nbt/journal/vaop/ncurrent/abs/nbt.2434.html
    Journal reference: Nature Biotechnology
    Provided by Northwestern University

    Read more at:
    phys dot org/news/2012-11-nanoparticle-halts-multiple-sclerosis-diabetes.html#jCp

    New nanoparticle halts multiple sclerosis, now being tested in Type 1 diabetes and asthma
    November 18, 2012

    In a breakthrough for nanotechnology and multiple sclerosis, a biodegradable nanoparticle turns out to be the perfect vehicle to stealthily deliver an antigen that tricks the immune system into stopping its attack on myelin and halt a model of relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis (MS) in mice, according to new Northwestern Medicine research.

    The new nanotechnology also can be applied to a variety of immune-mediated diseases including Type 1 diabetes, food allergies and airway allergies such as asthma.

    In MS, the immune system attacks the myelin membrane that insulates nerves cells in the brain, spinal cord and optic nerve.
    When the insulation is destroyed, electrical signals can't be effectively conducted, resulting in symptoms that range from mild limb numbness to paralysis or blindness.
    About 80 percent of MS patients are diagnosed with the relapsing remitting form of the disease.

    The Northwestern nanotechnology does not suppress the entire immune system as do current therapies for MS, which make patients more susceptible to everyday infections and higher rates of cancer.
    Rather, when the nanoparticles are attached to myelin antigens and injected into the mice, the immune system is reset to normal.
    The immune system stops recognizing myelin as an alien invader and halts its attack on it.

    "This is a highly significant breakthrough in translational immunotherapy," said Stephen Miller, a corresponding author of the study and the Judy Gugenheim Research Professor of Microbiology-Immunology at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine.
    "The beauty of this new technology is it can be used in many immune-related diseases.
    We simply change the antigen that's delivered."
    "The holy grail is to develop a therapy that is specific to the pathological immune response, in this case the body attacking myelin," Miller added.
    "Our approach resets the immune system so it no longer attacks myelin but leaves the function of the normal immune system intact."

    The nanoparticle, made from an easily produced and already FDA-approved substance, was developed by Lonnie Shea, professor of chemical and biological engineering at Northwestern's McCormick School of Engineering and Applied Science.
    "This is a major breakthrough in nanotechnology, showing you can use it to regulate the immune system," said Shea, also a corresponding author.

    The paper will be published Nov. 18 in the journal Nature Biotechnology.
    Miller and Shea are also members of the Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center of Northwestern University.
    In addition, Shea is a member of the Institute for BioNanotechnology in Medicine and the Chemistry of Life Processes Institute.

    CLINICAL TRIAL FOR MS TESTS SAME APPROACH -- WITH KEY DIFFERENCE

    The study's method is the same approach now being tested in multiple sclerosis patients in a phase I/II clinical trial -- with one key difference.
    The trial uses a patient's own white blood cells -- a costly and labor intensive procedure -- to deliver the antigen.
    The purpose of the new study was to see if nanoparticles could be as effective as the white blood cells as delivery vehicles.
    They were...

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I will post on this tomorrow, but you seem to have done a mighty job already

      Delete
  8. Prof G,

    What happened to 2012 being a "momentous year" for MS research?

    From the recent discussions we are further from effective treatments which stop this disease than we ever have been. I'd say this is the most depressing year in MS research! Really felt progress was made and yet, once again, defeat was snatched from the jaws of victory!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Alemtuzumab emerging as a DMT for MS! It may offer some RRMSers the chance of a cure.

      Delete
    2. MouseDoc running a half-marathon!

      Delete
    3. Why is Alem (and other 'hard' meds) being tested in progressive MSers though if chances are very unlikely that it will have any effect on progression? Surely the case of neurodegeneration - glial inflammation is known to all researchers so why bother? Or is your change of mind down to some preliminary results on that front?

      Delete
    4. Re "Alemtuzumab emerging as a DMT for MS! It may offer some RRMSers the chance of a cure."

      Yeah, perhaps those MSers that develop the early signs of RRMS three or four years from now. The rest of us are screwed. Thanks for nothing.

      Delete
    5. Yep me running, is pretty monumentous so don't forget to sponsor me:-)

      Delete
    6. Alemz and the other anti-inflammatory drugs don't stop progression, but they may slow it down. This may not seem important at an individual level, but could make a big difference at a population level. I suspect this is what has been happening with IFNbeta and GA over the last 20 years; a large part of MS becoming less aggressive and more benign may be the impact of DMTs the population.

      Delete
  9. I would kindly ask Prof. G team if the post I published a couple of hours ago has been erased as spam. I was only mentioning a study published yesterday by the DMSG (German Society for MS) and done in Hamburg university, showing that a Sodium channel blocker used also for Diabetes stops EAE in mice, with a neuro-protective effect. As neuroprotection now seems to be the best target for new MS drugs, I guess this is an important news to consider. I also included the link to the DMSG but I guess this was the reason why my post was erased.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I have looked in Spam and the posts awaiting moderation and there is nothing from you. I have not seen it, I do not know if Prof G did any thing, but he does not usually do this if there is text with it.

      I have had had a look on the site and with my not so good German can see a paper in Nature medicine from Friese from Hamburg and TRPM4. I will have a look and go a post. Hope they show real neuroprotection and not the usual immunosuppression.

      Team G have two trials looking at different sodium channel blockers

      Delete
    2. It looks good, I have done a post that will apeear this week.

      Delete
  10. Ok, MouseDoctor,sorry for the misunderstanding. I must have erased it without noticing. Indeed it seems very interesting to me. I can't wait to your post concerning this topic (as all your other posts), I'm serious when I say you're doing a great job and you're dedicating mucn personal time answering questions after midnight. Heartful thanks from the continent ;-)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes thank you so much MD. But go easy on the blogging. Don't let it eat into sleep or tv or marathon prep or lab time or teaching or anything else you need to do

      Delete
    2. The following post was made at 5.07

      I saw today in the DMSG (Deutsche Multiple Sklerose Gesellschaft) website, a news published yesterday from the University of Hamburg, in which they claim that blocking the Sodium channels (namely the TRPM4 channel) stops disease progression in EAE from mice, with a neuroprotective effect. They mention a drug used for Diabetes targeting the Na+ channel as well which is already in
      the market. I attach the link hereafter:
      http://www.dmsg.de/multiple-sklerose-news/index.php?w3pid=news&kategorie schung&anr

      My question is: Now neuroprotection really seems like the main target for all of us (taking into account your multiple recent posts disregarding relapses as the main disability-driver), should we consider this approach while Phase III neuroprotective drugs are released?

      Therefore submitted. We (Prof) are not sure how it was deleted. We have been considering this approach for years.

      Delete
  11. My boyfriend's father sent me this article and I wondered if it was research you were aware of?

    http://www.news-medical.net/news/20121119/New-nanoparticle-halts-relapsing-remitting-multiple-sclerosis-in-mouse-model.aspx

    I had a search and couldn't see anything about this, so apologies if I missed it.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Please ignore - I've just seen it posted above, but it didn't show up on the search.

      Delete
    2. MD has also done a post on this today in more detail and with his salty analysis!

      Delete
  12. Hi Posy,
    The article you refer to is essentially a repeat of some work we did back in 2005 (which the current authors ignore, much to my frustration!).

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks for that - I'll let him know it's already been covered. I can only imagine the irritation of other people failing to acknowledge your work: bad manners at best, plagiarism at worst!

      Delete
    2. Don't worry, it's an occupational hazard of research! probably had something to do with us failing to replicate some of one of the authors earlier work.
      Glad the bead work is reproducible though but our study was better!

      Delete
  13. Please tell us more about brain atrophy.
    How is it measured? Does it need some special equipment or a normal MRI machine? Does the measurement depend on the radiologist's judgement?
    Do you expect it will be routinely measured anytime soon?
    It has never been mentioned in any of my MRI reports.

    ReplyDelete
  14. It is measured by repeat MRI and then lining up the images, its problem is that atrophy can be masked by swelling.

    ReplyDelete
  15. Team G - have you seen the recent finding from Australia (Prof Beutzhoven) with their explanation for the increased female to male ratio in MS. According to them it's linked to latitude/Vit D exposure - and as I like to think not only women wearing foundation but from teenage years on facial creams with UV-blocker. Put powder or foundation on top of cream and here we go....

    ReplyDelete
  16. Is this the correct spelling, probably part of the equation

    ReplyDelete
  17. Mouse, the study is called " Geographical Variations in Sex Ratio Trends over Time in Multiple Sclerosis." It's on pubmed.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. http://multiple-sclerosis-research.blogspot.co.uk/2012/11/research-sex-ms-is-increasing-in-women.html

      Delete
    2. Is is from New Zealand rather than Australia It is on PLos one so you can all read it

      Delete

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