Wednesday, 19 December 2012

Memory impairment does not affect the outcome of quality of life questionnaires

Baumstarck et al. Relevance of quality of life assessment for multiple sclerosis patients with memory impairment. PLoS One. 2012;7(12):e50056. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0050056

BACKGROUND: Memory disturbances, in particular episodic verbal memory dysfunction, are the most frequent cognitive impairment observed inmultiple sclerosis (MS) patients. The use of self-reported outcomes for evaluating treatment and managing care of these subjects has been questioned. The aim of this study was to provide new evidence about the suitability of self-reported outcomes for use in this impaired population by exploring the internal structure, reliability and external validity of a specific quality of life (QoL) instrument, the Multiple Sclerosis International Quality of Life questionnaire (MusiQoL).

METHODS: Design: cross-sectional study. Inclusion criteria: MS patients of any disease subtype. Data collection: sociodemographic (age, gender, marital status, education level, and occupational activity) and clinical data (MS subtype, Expanded Disability Status Scale, disease duration); QoL (MusiQoL and SF36); and memory performance (Grober and Buschke test). In accordance with the French norms of the memory test, non-impaired and impaired populations were defined for short- and long-delay free composites and for short- and long-delay total composites. For the 8 populations, psychometric properties were compared to those reported from the reference population assessed in the validation study.

PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: One hundred and twenty-four consecutive patients were enrolled. The analysis performed in the impaired populations showed that the questionnaire structure adequately matched the initial structure of the MusiQoL. The unidimensionality of the dimensions was preserved, and the internal/external validity indices were close to those of the reference population.

CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our study suggests that memory dysfunction did not compromise the reliability or validity of the self-reported QoL questionnaires.





I forgot about the results from this one, but it says that if you have a memory problem it does not influence your ability to complete  questionnaires that are designed to assess quality of life. Would you agree with this?

11 comments:

  1. I understand it to refer to quality of life rather than lifestyle. Both would be impacted in my case; I am a university lecturer and researcher and memory is central to my job. If I had severe memory problems, I could not stay in my job. I don't have them, fortunately, but got a dose of them in the my first big clinical episode of ms due to which I was diagnosed.

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    1. I agree absolutely! I am a business analyst and my job requires me to think logically and to be able to quickly grasp processes and concepts, to be able to document these, then present them and suggested innovations to my peers and seniors. Attending meetings, recalling details and arguing cases is central to my job, so memory, clarity of thought and the ability to articulate said thoughts are essential. If I lose my job or have my potential for promotion restricted by MS, this will impact my lifestyle and quality of life as I am the primary bread-winner and any kind of enforced early retirement will make for a very uncomfortable future.

      In terms of my "extra curricular" activities, I thoroughly enjoy keeping-up with current affairs and having friendly arguments with people about what is going on in the world: it has also always been my intention to attain a Masters degree and even work towards a PhD in later life, if I was in a financial position to do so. With all this in mind, the cognitive problems I experienced during my first episode will SEVERELY impact my quality of life and lifestyle if my episodes become frequent or if the cognitive problems do not completely dissipate. I fear the cognitive problems more than I fear the thought of physical problems.

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    2. I know just what you mean. You may well be able to attain these things. I did my PhD on yet undiagnosed ms and strongly believe that it was perhaps a little harder at times but gave me excellent cognitive training :-) Two years after the episode that led to diagnosis, I have been on my second med for a year now (fingolimod/Gilenya), my ms seems much calmer and my cognition seems 99.5 % normal again - very glad that this is the case. Wishing you the best!

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  2. I don't think this study says anything about impact on QoL- it is about the validity of QoL scales when memory is impaired. Clearly this is important if PROMS are to be widely used in clinical trials. I think your summary may be incorrect.

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    1. Summary seems to be correct - can you trust patient reports of lifestyle if memory is impaired

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    2. The title of the post is 'Memory impairment does not aftect [sic] quality of life'. This in incorrect.

      The summary says 'if you have a memory problem it does not influenced [sic] if you say if your liffestyle [sic] is good or not'. It does not influence how you say if your lifestyle is good or not, but it may well influence if you say your lifestyle is good or not. Your precise of the summary doesn't match the actual summary.

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    3. hes always incorrect in lots

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    4. Please explain "Always Incorrect" , sometimes that's human error, always then Why read the posts? Why write the posts?

      Evidence please and I know I'm letting myself in it here.

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  3. this is just a copy n paste hes using from journals

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    1. Yes, that is what we do. Interpret good, bad and other research news, and a little bit more!

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