Thursday, 27 December 2012

Research: Smoking increases Risk of MS

Epub: Salzer et al. Smoking as a risk factor for multiple sclerosis. Mult Scler. 2012 Dec 20.

BACKGROUND: Smoking has been associated with an increased risk for multiple sclerosis, but no studies have measured levels of the nicotine metabolite cotinine in prospectively collected samples to assess exposure.

OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effects of laboratory defined tobacco use on the risk for multiple sclerosis using prospectively collected biobank blood samples.

METHODS: Levels of cotinine were measured in n=192 cases, and n=384 matched controls, using an immunoassay. The risk for multiple sclerosis was estimated using matched logistic regression.

RESULTS: Elevated cotinine levels (≥10 ng/ml) were associated with a significantly increased risk for multiple sclerosis, (odds ratio, OR 1.5, 95% confidence interval, CI 1.0-2.1). This association was only present in young individuals (below median age at blood sampling, <26.4 years), (OR 2.2, 95% CI 1.3-3.8).

CONCLUSIONS: This study confirms that smoking is a risk factor for multiple sclerosis. It has the advantage of using analyses of cotinine levels in samples that were collected several years before disease onset, thus excluding any risk for recall bias and minimising the risk for reversed causation. Our results also suggest that the smoking related immunological events that contribute to the development of multiple sclerosis occur early in life.


Yet more evidence of the increased risk of developing MS if you  smoke. You also need to spread the message to your children and family, who are all at increased risk of developing MS if they smoke.

10 comments:

  1. No wonder, smoking is not good thing for your endothelial cells among other things.. this is interesting: "Risk factors for CCSVI are similar to risk factors for developing MS, UB study shows"

    http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2011-11/uab-rff113011.php

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  2. Methanol can have had an such effects, even if one never has actually smoked cigarettes .

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    Replies
    1. I think we should move on from this less we awake
      the beast. But search for "rmforall" if you want to get link to this hypothesis. I dont want to debate this

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    2. since you asked,
      rmforall.blogspot dot com
      whilesciencesleeps dot com

      Delete
  3. Never smoked and never lived or worked in smoking environment. Got MS = smoking not a risk factor. Smoking was huge in the 20s and 30s, yet only now is MS at high levels. Perhaps the only connection is smokers more risk takers so more likely to get Gladular Fever (EBV). EBV only risk factor to focus on. Stop EBV = stop MS.

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    1. Not smoking does not mean you will not get MS it is a risk factor that makes it 1 and half to 2 times more likely. Likewise because you are a smoker does not mean you will not get Altzheimers or Parkinsons diseases but your risks are less. Likewise just because one can be female does not mean you will or will not get MS.

      You can not do/should not do much about your sex....but smoking you can. By encouraging children not to do it. The health and financial benefits are clear. Couple this to being vitamin replete and you save a few people from developing ms later on in life.

      CoI As an ex smoker i think your point is well made that smoking behavioir maybe links to the risk factor. If the health profession spent as much effort demonizing ice cream/cars as they have cigarettes,there would be more information on the risks of ice cream/cars.

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    2. I quit smoking 20+ years before my diagnosis, but I always suspected it got MS going in me. The difference between we 1970s/1980s smokers and those in the 1920s/1930s might have been the formulation. I smoked mostly ultralight cigarettes that had godonlyknowswhat chemicals to make them pass as light, while still keeping them satisfying to my brain and lungs. Just guessing.

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  4. I don't like smoking, but I often have to when using cannabis for my MS symptoms. I don't like to put weed in my food because it's hard to assess quantities and it takes ages for it to hit in, whereas when you smoke it the results are instant.

    I hate having to buy it via the black-market and feel uneasy having dope in my house, but it does offer me relief from spasticity. It also helps me sleep better. I wish it was legalised or issued in a pill form that reduced some of the drowsiness.

    MS has turned me into a smoking criminal. Neither one is a good fit for me.

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    Replies
    1. Have a look into Iolite vapourisers, it cuts out the need to smoke. A very convienient way to take your MJ.

      Regards

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  5. Smoking increases risk of many health related problems, nowadays you can quit this habit easily with the use of electronic cigarettes which are way safer than the tobacco filled ones.

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