Thursday, 20 December 2012

Unrelated Blogger Comments - action pending

Sometimes you want to say something that is unrelated to the threads. This is a spot for You. Previous comments can be got at on the posts on the right of the main page.


21 comments:

  1. Apologies if this has already been covered, but I've searched and can't see anything: is it something you're aware of?

    "PORTLAND, Oregon -- Oregon Health & Sciences University researchers are celebrating their new discovery they say stands a good chance of helping people suffering from multiple sclerosis and a range of other neurological disorders.

    They've discovered high levels of a particular enzyme not usually found in the brain, only in those with brain damage due to MS, stroke and conditions.

    Lead researcher Larry Sherman Ph.D. believes if they can figure out how to block the enzyme, the brain can repair itself, where insulating shields around nerve cells have been damaged or destroyed.

    "We have a chance now of understanding a whole new process that's preventing repair of the brain. And we have the possibility of finding a drug in the next several years that could repair the brain in MS patients and other patients where this nerve sheath is destroyed," said Sherman.

    The next step is to find a drug or combination of medicines that block the enzyme. Researchers will first try to find a successful treatment using Japanese Macaque monkeys at the Oregon National Primate Research Center, affiliated with OHSU. The small percentage of the monkeys have a disease similar to MS in humans.

    "These animals get this disease spontaneously and if we can reverse this disease process in these animals--show that it's safe--it does its job. We are hopeful we can then take this to patients, hopefully in the next 10 to 15 years if not sooner," said Sherman."

    Posted on November 5, 2012
    http://www.kvue.com/news/Multiple-sclerosis-breakthrough-at-OHSU-177397751.html

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    1. If you look on November 6th.

      http://multiple-sclerosis-research.blogspot.co.uk/2012/11/research-getting-rid-of-spam-is-not.html

      Preston M et al. Digestion products of the PH20 hyaluronidase inhibit remyelination. Annal Neurol DOI: 10.1002/ana.23788

      Did you write to Prof G, he said he does not remember anything? What email did you use.

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    2. I'm not having much luck with the blog's search function!

      Ref the other, I wrote to his Barts email address, and referenced it "Posy". I have semi-success: I've been able to confirm with Barts' appointments dept that they have received my GP's referral (after it was re-faxed!) for "Dr. Ben" and it is apparently winging its way to his secretary, but I've not been able to reach her for confirmation that she has received it. I'm going to try again tomorrow...

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    3. Update to above: I have had verbal confirmation that an appointment has been booked for me to see "Dr. Ben" toward the end of January and written confirmation of the above is apparently winging its way through the Christmas post to me. Happy days!

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  2. Do you have any response to Posy's 17 Dec post re an enzyme, reported Portland, Oregon? Thanks

    Having met MD2 briefly at MS Life, why am I not surprised at his musical interests and previous performing life?! Hope you're still enjoying playing, MD2...

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    1. Dear anonymous,
      Still playing thanks and still enjoying it and getting better. Not many aspects of life you can say that about at my age!

      Check MD's post above the enzyme was covered here on Nov 6th.

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    2. Dear Anon
      I did not respond except to say that we had posted on this work on November 6th so if you copy the link you get the story, I then also posted on 18th with this, which suggests the same pathway influences
      white cell migration, unfortunately in the opposite to the repair angle, unless I misread.

      http://multiple-sclerosis-research.blogspot.co.uk/2012/12/research-hyaluronidase-is-used-for.html

      P.S. The clip was from one of the two "Babe Maggots" gigs (Babe magnet mispelt) in the "Eagle" of "Up and down the city road in and out the Eagle, that's the way the money goes, pop goes the weasel" fame. Whole Lotta Petey was a reworking of the AC/DC classic "Whole lotta Rosie" about one of our work colleagues...Next time maybe can have MD2 doing "Old Street, Old street" in his Frank Sinartra T shirt of New York, New York fame.

      We don't do things by halfs

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    3. My mistake. It is the legendary Whole Lotta Petey. Here's the boys are back in town anyway.
      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zIuWLrg1tFo

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    4. I just listened to the original on youtube and I won't call that singing either.

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    5. Thanks for the thumbs up guess I will have to stick to the day job

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  3. Haha I almost put exactly those words in my question. But why be rude - for all I know you may be proud of your singing

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    1. Any limitations in the MD vocal department are more than made up in stage presence!

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  4. Sorry, a bit of a random question here, but I've received a message from a friend of a friend who seems to think that because I have MS I must know what it's all about (when in fact "clueless" is an understatement!): simply, is it possible to have MS but for the MRI and LP results to be negative?

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  5. Very proud of my singing but realistic enough to know it ain't great...Guess the X factor is out of the question

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    1. Will you be doing a session at the research day? Take over a chill-out room...!

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    2. We'd need an articulated lorry to shift all the gear!

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  6. Posy, I too wondered about whether MD2 will be performing at the Research day - maybe we'll find that elusive therapy for MS?!

    Re your question re friend of friend, this seems to happen to q a few people if you look at the MS Society's Everyday Living Forum.

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    1. Cheers - I'll send her there!

      And yes, maybe there is a certain tone when hit with precisely the right amount of vibrato at a specific decibel that will magically mend the myelin!

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    2. Perhaps a loud distorted heavy metal flattened fifth will do the trick. Won't do much for your hearing though!

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