Wednesday, 30 January 2013

4th MS Research Day - 2nd Febuary 2013

If you can't make the research day on Saturday you can follow the event on Twitter. We will be using the following hashtag(#): #msresearchday.


For those of you new to Twitter:

YOU CANNOT “FOLLOW” A HASHTAG DIRECTLY THROUGH YOUR TWITTER ACCOUNT. This is generally a confusing point for those of you who are new to Twitter and hashtags (#). A hashtag is not a source of tweets; it is simply a way of labelling or tagging tweets so they can be easily pulled together as a group. Hashtagging is the mechanism used for trending.

TWITTER SEARCH: An easy way to track hashtags is through your web browser or twitter App: go to Twitter Search. Search for a hashtag you want to track. Include the “#” in your search query, for example #MSBlog. Keep the page open in your browser and refresh it to see the latest results. 


TRACKING TOOL: You can also use a third-party tool for using and monitoring Twitter. The one I use is Tweetdeck; there are great Tweetdeck and Chrome Apps for your smart phone and chrome browser. 

12 comments:

  1. “From the Frontlines: New Avenues In MS Research for 2013"Wednesday, January 30, 2013 2:32:00 pm

    I just want to give a heads up to everyone that tonight the annual American MS Society’s webcast on research agendas and results will be streamed tonight at 7pm GMT.

    (http://www.nationalmssociety.org/multimedia-library/webcasts--podcasts/new-avenues-2013/index.aspx)

    Topics include:
    Research progress made during 2012
    Promising research on the horizon for 2013
    Novel strategies for promoting repair in MS
    International initiative to drive research on progressive MS
    What’s the microbiome and what does it mean for MS?

    Moderator: Kate Milliken

    Panelists include:

    Dr. Timothy Coetzee, Chief Research Officer of the National MS Society
    Dr. Stephen Krieger, Neurologist, Corinne Goldsmith Dickinson Centre for MS and Assistant Professor of Neurology at the Mount Sinai School of Medicine
    Dr. Ellen Mowry, Assistant Professor of Neurology at Johns Hopkins University
    Dr. James Salzer, Professor, Departments of Cell Biology and Neurology; Co-Director of the Centre of Excellence for Multiple Sclerosis at NYU Langone Medical Centre

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    Replies
    1. Thanks for flagging this. I just noticed that the American MS Society has put a link to this blog on their main homepage! This blog has truly gone international and is now considered one of the most important platforms in health education. This is a seriously impressive achievement Team G. Well done to you all.

      This small blog has gone from strength to strength, enriching the lives of countless individuals affected by MS. I don't think that Team G fully comprehends just how amazing a thing they have created, and how eyes across the world focus on it everyday. MSers, clinicians, pharmaceutical professionals and medical students make a ritual of visiting everyday. Keep up the good work, guys.

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    2. Yes, a truly marvelous enterprise. I noticed the link too. Also in a German forum there was mentioning of some things said on this blog with a link to it, high time to put a link on the official MS site.

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    3. Most kind anons 4.22 and 4.32! I'm sure Profs G and mouse will be chuffed!

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    4. OMG! The MS Society USA really has put a link to this blog on their main page! That is awesome!

      To think that this blog gained momentum purely on the basis of it being relevant to people with MS. Unlike other MS organisations that receive generous charitable subsidies (often well deserved, mind), you guys simply created something on Blogger that people sought out. We came to you. It didn’t take expensive promotion or pharmaceutical sponsorship; it just took simple and honest commitment. That’s why this blog is so successful. The blog has a simple and transparent agenda, which is to inform and educate. You guys have empowered us, made us knowledgeable about the nature of MS and how best to deal with it. It is so important to have clinicians and scientists like you lot in Team G to move things forward.

      Never give up on us!

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  2. Thanks for the info - will be tuning in.

    To Team G - wishing you a great research day on Sat. Can't wait for the videos.

    Prof G - would it be possible for you in your opening remarks to say 'hi' to the bloggers so that we can be somehow included (while watching it afterwards)? Only if you wish that is. Best regards.

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  3. Go on TEAM G! Today America, tomorrow the world!

    Before some big organisation swallows you up and soups-up your blog site with better graphics and interactivity, at least I’ll be able to say I was with you from the very start in 2010. (I know you began in 2009, but really it began to take shape when I started to follow.)

    Congratulations to everyone.

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  4. We mustn't get too carried away. In the words of the late Michael Winner "calm down dear".

    We've still got no treatments for progression and no treatments to encourage repair. Blogs don't make my MS any better. Blogs are words and we need more than words to see progression stopped or EDSS scores to drop.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I agree with you, however, it is a big deal that the blog's profile has grown stupendously within a few years of inception. Considering the amount of sarcastic flack MS researchers on this blog get, which at times makes this feel like the NME Music website, it's nice to read some optimistic feedback.

      Must say the live stream was almost the same as the last three years US MS annual research webcasts. Very little new ground covered. Hope the Barts MS conference this weekend goes one better. Mind, you'll be competing with the NFL Superbowl;-)

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    2. Oh dear - we, who celebrate the people who daily take our interests & our disease to heart, know very well that words on a blog can't cure MS - or can they? A word can be the first step towards a paradigm shift in thinking about many aspects of MS from pathogenesis to drug making policies. A word can be the beginning of a collaboration, it can convince an assessor to grant a fund or accept a paper for publication.
      A word can educate, give comfort & the feeling of being part of a community diminishing anguish and ignorance. A word - and I can give you my word as a linguist for it - is always more than a word.

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    3. How about this word....Thanks...Thanks for your kind comments.

      This page has been a refreshing counterpoint to the previous Spamorama I have just been to next I will go and see how DoctorLove has faired with the tongue lashing she was receiving this morning

      Must go to bed soon as have a teleconference in 5 and bit hours time, only someone form US does the power breakfast stuff... luckily for them they are in Paris with an extra hour in bed due to time difference.

      Did you know that our readers from USA far outnumber our UK readers. We need to get someone from USA in Team G.......well we have you guys.

      It is really enlightening taking to people from different places to see how things are differnt from country to country. Reading your comments have been very educational and we have been getting great support form our friends in the US.

      PS Mrs Mouse is from the USA and I have loads of friends there.

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    4. I'm doing a post on the blog on saturday there are some lovely comments here, maybe I should change my slides would make a nicer message than being called a "TOILET ROLL" which is the one I have. It is funny how graffiti artists leave there name in the message, T ROLL = TROLL, you'ld think it would be easy to catch them..we know were some of em live :-)

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