Friday, 27 September 2013

The story of campath-1h, now known as alemtuzumab

"Some of you may find this video interesting."

"The key take home messages are: (1) how long it takes to develop a drug for MS, (2) how important scientists, researchers and neurologists are in the process of drug development and (3) you need the pharmaceutical industry to get it to market."


CoI: multiple

17 comments:

  1. I have been waiting for the development of this drug. I recently got more bad news however, and am wondering if this makes it so I will not be able to receive the treatment. If I was recently diagnosed with type II diabetes, does that preclude me from being able to be able to use Alemtuzumab?

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  2. Excellent overview. Puts into perspective all the work that goes into R&D and the dedicated individuals. Only wish is that the process of discovery to bedside could be accelerated, especially for conditions with no available therapy.

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  3. Campath-1h is a truly amazing story. As an MSer I can only thank all the people involved in getting this treatment to market. Thank you.

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  4. Prof G the most important messages you left out is getting NICE to allow the drug to be used in the NHS and finally to get your fellow neurologists to prescribe the drug. Two battles I hope that you and Professors Compston and Coles are already fighting.

    P.S. I am glad to see you got a mention in the film; you were clearly an early adopter.

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  5. Thanks for the link! Excellent video. I searched for Alemtuzumab Videos in the past, but didn't find a lot.
    Maybe they should expand their tags with "Alemtuzumab", "MabCampath" and "Lemtrada". So more people would find this video via a term they already know.

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  6. A very inspiring story; a must see for anyone who has MS.

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  7. Dr Coles gets my vote for the MS man of the moment.

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  8. Great PR for Cambridge! I thought Compston and Coles were the Campath heroes. In fact they are way down the pecking order when it comes to accolades. Genzyme probably deserve a big cheer; without their investment the Campath story would be one of disappointment.

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    1. Certainly shows that you don't get far without partnering with pharma but great kudos due to the two A's whose dogged persistence meant things kept moving forward over a long long time.

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  9. Great they were in the right time at the right place. Unlike oral cladribine

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    1. clabribine a useful drug thrown away........like clofarabine (same action as cladribine but an oral version compared to the i.v subcutaneous version . I guess stuck on a shelf at Genzymne rotting

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    2. The burning question is how much are Sanofi going to charge for the drug, too much and we will have the wrangle with NICE who will not take the real costs of MS into the equation.

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    3. Oral cladribine was not developed further for business reasons. Its patent was under threat and quite short. If cladribine came off patent early and became available as a cheap generic equivalent then it would have destroyed the MS market; some say it would have taken it from a $15 billion to a $6 billion market overnight. It is not about the drug not being effective, it is about money. Alemtuzumab is protected from this as it is a biological or protein therapy; when biologicals come off patent they seldom if ever cause the market to crash. The MS DMT market is about Pharma profits, and some would say greed. I am not against Pharma making profit that is why they exist. Are you?

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  10. But will this drug be limited to the newly diagnosed,- or the 'young'. Trials of this drug in Australia excluded anyone over 50, and you have to had the diagnosis for < 5 years. What happens to people who were late diagnosed and whose immune systems are not as robust as the young?

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    1. The As from Cambridge probably have the data that hints how early is early. Also what is late. We know it does not stop secondary progressive disease...but does it change the slope of worsening...I wonder.I you look at SPMS there are active inflammatory lesions who they benefit from being shut down...I suspect so.

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  11. Replies
    1. Depends how risk averse they are,....but it is not their disease that they are trying to stop. Choice....that is what we want..obviously safety is a a concern also.

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