Tuesday, 24 December 2013

Not every one agrees with us

Kong W, Li H, Tuma RF, Ganea D. Selective CB2 receptor activation ameliorates EAE by reducing Th17 differentiation and immune cell accumulation in the CNS. Cell Immunol. 2013 Nov 14;287(1):1-17. doi: 10.1016/j.cellimm.2013.11.002. [Epub ahead of print]

CB2, the cannabinoid receptor expressed primarily on hematopoietic cells and activated microglia, mediates the immunoregulatory functions of cannabinoids. The involvement of CB2 in EAE has been demonstrated by using both endogenous and exogenous ligands. We showed previously that CB2 selective agonists inhibit leukocyte rolling and adhesion to CNS microvasculature and ameliorate clinical symptom in both chronic and remitting-relapsing EAE models. Here we showed that Gp1a, a highly selective CB2 agonist, with a four log higher affinity for CB2 than CB1, reduced clinical scores and facilitated recovery in EAE in conjunction with long term reduction in demyelination and axonal loss. We also established that Gp1a affected EAE through at least two different mechanisms, i.e. an early effect on Th1/Th17 differentiation in peripheral immune organs, and a later effect on the accumulation of pathogenic immune cells in the CNS, associated with reductions in the expression of CNS and T cell chemokine receptors, chemokines and adhesion molecules. This is the first report on the in vivo CB2-mediated Gp1a inhibition of Th17/Th1 differentiation. We also confirmed the Gp1a-induced inhibition of Th17/Th1 differentiation in vitro, both in non-polarizing and polarizing conditions. The CB2-induced inhibition of Th17 differentiation is highly relevant in view of recent studies emphasizing the importance of pathogenic self-reactive Th17 cells in EAE/MS. In addition, the combined effect on Th17 differentiation and immune cell accumulation into the CNS, emphasize the relevance of CB2 selective ligands as potential therapeutic agents in neuroinflammation.
You say we  don't report contradictory stuff so here you are! 
Not everyone agrees with TeamG

Croxford JL, Pryce G, Jackson SJ, Ledent C, Giovannoni G, Pertwee RG, Yamamura T, Baker D.Cannabinoid-mediated neuroprotection, not immunosuppression, may be more relevant to multiple sclerosis.J Neuroimmunol. 2008 ;193(1-2):120-9. 

Sisay S, Pryce G, Jackson SJ, Tanner C, Ross RA, Michael GJ, Selwood DL, Giovannoni G, Baker D. Genetic background can result in a marked or minimal effect of gene knockout (GPR55 and CB2 receptor) in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis models of multiple sclerosis.PLoS One. 2013 Oct 9;8(10):e76907. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0076907.

2 comments:

  1. Would you say a few words about what you disagree with, and what your view is (ie, the disagreement) ? Thanks very much, just trying to work out exctly what you are saying and what you are disagreeing with - hope you understand! Best wishes for 2014 :-)

    ReplyDelete
  2. This study suggsts that stimulating CB2 will be benefical for controlling the immune response in relapsing (MS).
    We think that this will not be useful. Based on years of trying to show a useful use of thid target.

    ReplyDelete

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