Monday, 3 February 2014

Unrelated Comments: February 2014


Sometimes you want to say something unrelated to the posts. This is the place for you! 

19 comments:

  1. http://msj.sagepub.com/content/early/2014/02/03/1352458514521888.full
    Using cytotoxic CD8+ to control EBV.

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  2. Is multiple sclerosis becoming more prevelant in rappers? We know it has effected Dr. Dre because he posts here alot, but it seems also one of his associates, Masta Ace, was diagnosed also:

    http://iamhiphopmag.com/2013/12/masta-ace-diagnosed-with-multiple-sclerosis/

    I think this should be looked seriously to determine if rap music is a predictor of MS.

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  3. How is charcoot project going? Are you done with accepting people?

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    Replies
    1. Does it mean you won't finish this study until the end of 2014?

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    2. the truth. the comments underneath the article are fantastic.

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  4. If you left some pills of BG-12 out in below freezing temperature in a car for a couple of hours would they be safe to use?

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  5. http://www.msconnection.org/Blog/January-2014/Synapses-MS-An-interview-with-Dr-Ben-Barres
    People often regard MS as only demyelinating, but Dr. Barres has been studying synaptic loss leading to axonal loss and progression and gives a quick overview of the research.

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  6. You made it into the Daily Mail on Valentines day:

    Babies conceived on Valentine's Day are the least likely to suffer from multiple sclerosis

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-2555880/Babies-conceived-Valentines-Day-likely-suffer-multiple-sclerosis-charity-claims.html

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    Replies
    1. But talking garbage- there is no month of birth effect?

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  7. You can always rely on the Daily Mash ... not sure what for, though!

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  8. I've noticed that most patients with haematological malignancies seem to enter a trial to see if a particular drug regimen improves care. When you look at a disease such as acute myeloid leukaemia, there have been multiple rolling trials recruiting numerous patients over the years - currently up to AML 17 (http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/research/activity/mds/trials/bctu/completed-trial-research/adhoc/aml/index.aspx).

    Given that there remains so much uncertainty about MS treatment, would there be any way that funding could be found so that all MS patients get enrolled into trials to try to thrash out the best treatment paradigms in a continuous manner, rather than the fairly piecemeal way they are performed today?

    I note that the funding for the trial mentioned above appears to come from the MRC - is there much similar public money in MS research?

    Obviously there are barriers, in that outcomes from haematological malignancies can be measured with blood tests and mortality rates - which are cheaper and more definitive than what is currently available for MS. I would also assume that many of the haematology drugs are off patent and therefore widely available at relatively low cost. The somewhat discrete and relatively short course of these cancers is obviously also a major difference between them and MS.

    Is there any reason why a model such as this couldn't be ruled out in an attempt to get some proper large scale handle on the different MS therapies?

    To bring this back to a personal level, what I can see is a lot of research activity for a very deadly disease (AML) that mainly affects older patients who will often have had a good quality of life for the previous 30 years. MS can render people into a state that gives them a very poor quality of life from early on, but has seemed somewhat neglected due to its slow progress and the relatively small affect it has on mortality. I'm perhaps also thinking about haematological malignancy given that some of the more potent MS treatments are also cancer therapies.

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    Replies
    1. It would seem obvious that drugs that are used in leukamia to ablate the immune system to kill off the leukaemic cells could have a use in MS in smaller doses. Cladribine is currently being trialed in a chemo cocktail to treat AML, and alemtuzumab was first used in CLL. The standard protocol for treatment for AML has changed little over 40 years despite all the trials, and survival rates can depend on the myloid cell involved (20-80%), apart from age, general health and medical treatment. Although cancer is rare in children and teenagers, the most common cancer in children is leukaemia. Although this is usually ALL, in the under 2's it is AML. Clinical trials for children are generally for those up to the age of 15; adult trials are for those 18 and over. So, shockingly, 16 and 17 year olds can rarely get on to clinical trials for any drug.
      I can't see rolling trials for MS drugs working for the reasons you specify. If you're still alive 5 years post treatment for AML you're classified as cured. With MS it's more likely to be 20 years with NEDA.
      I had a teenage son with AML, and I have a son in his twenties with MS

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  9. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=24493798
    Researchers have found ganciclovir is effective in microglia deactivation but no mechanism is proposed.

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    Replies
    1. Yes have seen it. Ganciclovir at 100mg/kg inhibits EAE.

      The implication is no microglia activation, no disease. However as the work was largely in vivo it could be no disease, no microglial activation and so the action is totally unrelated to microglia.

      Why because if the immune response has not reached the CNS because of some inhibitory effect and no microglial activating factors are released. The literature is full of these chicken-egg links were drugs are causally linked to an action but the reality maybe it is a consequence .

      However before rushing out to get your anti-virals maybe read this one too.

      http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21046558.

      Treatment of these mice with ganciclovir leads to inhibition of reactive astrocytosis (an affect on astrocytes now) When mice were treated for seven days following onset of EAE with ganciclovir, disease severity increased. This paper is ignored by the authors of this current one.......Who does the refereeing of these papers?.......Slap dash.

      Wonder how many people with MS have had CMV-viral infection treated (5mg/kg).

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    2. Ignoring previous work is a common past time of some labs. It used to be if it wasnt published in a us journal it doesnt exsist. The internrt has got rid of that but habits die hard. We have given a few examples of our ignored work published years earlier. There are some authors would forget about their own work showing something else.

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  10. Top 10 Multiple Sclerosis Drugs; find out which MS drugs brought in the most money last year.

    http://www.genengnews.com/insight-and-intelligenceand153/top-10-multiple-sclerosis-drugs/77900039/

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  11. Prof G can you please post more articles related to PPMS, not just SPMS?
    We feel so left in the dark

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