Saturday, 30 August 2014

Insoles don't work?


Kalron A, Pasitselsky D, Greenberg-Abrahami M, Achiron A. Do textured insoles effect postural control and spatiotemporal parameters of gait and plantar sensation in people with multiple sclerosis? PM R. 2014 Aug 18. pii: S1934-1482(14)01327-6

BACKGROUND:Balance and gait deficits are common in people with multiple sclerosis (MS). Physical interventions directed at improving balance and walking abilities have implemented using various approaches.
OBJECTIVES:  To determine if textured insoles have immediate effects on postural control and spatiotemporal parameters of gait and plantar sensation in people with people with MS and to explore effects 4 weeks after insole wear as to whether any immediate effects are maintained over time.
RESULTS: Textured insoles did not alter static postural control parameters when examined with eyes open. Examination during the eyes closed task demonstrated an immediate reduction in the CoP path length (298.4 (S.E.=49.7) vs. 369.9 (S.E.=56.3); mm; P=.04) and sway rate (12.0 (S.E.=1.4) vs. 15.1 (S.E.=1.6); mm/s; P=.03) following insertion of the textured insoles compared to casual shoes. These findings were maintained at termination of the insole 4-week intervention period. In terms of spatiotemporal parameters of gait, differences were not observed between casual shoes and shoes with textured insoles at baseline. Likewise, no differences were observed between initial and concluding gait trials. Significant differences in plantar sensitivity measures were not observed following the insole 4-week intervention phase.
CONCLUSIONS: Although there were improvements in some aspects of balance, the efficacy of textured insoles in the MS population remains unclear.

So this study questions the value of textured insoles and puts other studies in doubt. 

Again one wonders where studies need to be large enough to provide definitive answers

1 comment:

  1. A textured sole is a cheap, risk-free strategy which may help people. Or may not. Worth a try - yes. Worth a post here? Not sure. The article doesn't mention the value of gait analysis by an orthotist, which may result in a prescription of an orthotic to fit in your shoe. My orthotics correct pronation and have improved walking exponentially. .

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