Sunday, 10 August 2014

Searching of the Web

Colombo C et al.Web search behavior and information needs of people with multiple sclerosis: focus group study and analysis ofonline postings.Interact J Med Res. 2014 Jul 24;3(3):e12. doi: 10.2196/ijmr.3034

Multiple sclerosis (MS) patients and their family members increasingly seek health information on the Internet. There has been little exploration of how MS patients integrate health information with their needs, preferences, and values for decision making. The INtegrating and Deriving Evidence, Experiences, and Preferences (IN-DEEP) project is a collaboration between Italian and Australian researchers and MS patients, aimed to make high-quality evidence accessible and meaningful to MS patients and families, developing a Web-based resource of evidence-based information starting from their information needs.
OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to analyze MS patients and their family members' experience about the Web-based health information, to evaluate how they asses this information, and how they integrate health information with personal values.
METHODS: We organized 6 focus groups, 3 with MS patients and 3 with family members, in the Northern, Central, and Southern parts of Italy (April-June 2011). They included 40 MS patients aged between 18 and 60, diagnosed as having MS at least 3 months earlier, and 20 family members aged 18 and over, being relatives of a person with at least a 3-months MS diagnosis. The focus groups were audio-recorded and transcribed verbatim (Atlas software, V 6.0). Data were analyzed from a conceptual point of view through a coding system. An online forum was hosted by the Italian MS society on its Web platform to widen the collection of information. Nine questions were posted covering searching behavior, use of Web-based information, truthfulness of Web information. At the end, posts were downloaded and transcribed.
RESULTS: Information needs covered a comprehensive communication of diagnosis, prognosis, and adverse events of treatments, MS causes or risk factors, new drugs, practical, and lifestyle-related information. The Internet is considered useful by MS patients, however, at the beginning or in a later stage of the disease a refusal to actively search for information could occur. Participants used to search on the Web before or after their neurologist's visit or when a new therapy was proposed. Social networks are widely used to read others' stories and retrieve information about daily management. A critical issue was the difficulty of recognizing reliable information on the Web. Many sources were used but the neurologist was mostly the final source of treatment decisions.
CONCLUSIONS: MS patients used the Internet as a tool to integrate information about the illness. Information needs covered a wide spectrum, the searched topics changed with progression of the disease. Criteria for evaluating Internet accuracy and credibility of information were often lacking or generic. This may limit the empowerment of patients in health care choices.
This paper is open source and you can read if you are interested, clearly you want information, but the  problem is quality control and how you assess that. It is clear that there is a load of old rubbish in many places including many of the respected media sites. Make sure that you verify your information from reputable sources

5 comments:

  1. Thats why this blog is great so thank you, it is much appreciated.

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  2. Yes. it's not only an essential read in itself, I know I don't need to bother with all the other stuff floating around on the net. And as I'm a consummate worrier, this is a godsend!

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    1. To be fair we may miss things and sometimes other sites do a better job explaining things...maybe more talent and a lot more time.

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  3. 'Make sure that you verify your information from reputable sources' - it's not always clear how to do this, tho' over time I've found that I've established one or two sources - here, national MS Societies - and stuck to those - and reduced the amount of time spent on the sites... after all, there IS more to life.

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    1. Exactly! I stopped Google alerts too

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