Sunday, 21 September 2014

Pipped to the Post

Science is competitive...are you the first person to publish the view, which may help you get that grant. The grant bodies want you to be open about your work and so now loads of people are putting their posters on the web.

So if you want to see what was published at ACTRIMS/ECTRIMS you can click here.  

However when you submit to ECTRIMS the data is supposed to be unpublished. Whilst people will photograph the contents of the poster on their phones or tablets, you are giving your results away to the world....I met a friend this week where their PhD student did a thesis. The universities put them online as soon as they are accepted, before it was officially published..... They were gene hunters and had information of a gene causing a disease. The science competition working on the same subject...saw the thesis, repeated the study and published the work, getting the first publication. So hats off to the people publishing their data so other people can pipp them to post.

5 comments:

  1. That is terrible that this occurs, and the scientific community should come up with a way to address this. I looked through a large portion of the posters as soon as they went online, and I found them extremely helpful for keeping up to date on my future prospects, treatments to discuss with my neurologist, and staying hopeful about all the promising work out there that could lead to a cure. The posters are also FAR more informative than the click-bait news articles I see afterwards.

    Please keep sharing results from these conferences with the general public!

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  2. Thanks for the link to ECTRIMS/ACTRIMS posters :-).
    The academic world is not a nice place, competitiveness is just one nasty side of it. It's best not to look around or you might start wondering why you are there :-)
    J

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  3. There is a solution.....People do not present their work unless it is already submitted and accepted for publication, so the stuff talked about comes out a few months after the conference but in many cases it is a few months before...so these talks are less interesting because you know the punchline before a word is uttered. This happens in areas where there is alot of competition. For ECTRIMS it is not supposed to be pubished before the meeting as part of the submission process.

    Likewise Gordon conferences are about presenting unpublished data....I personaly always like to present unpublished data in my talks and this is one of the reasons that I do not put my slides on the blog as it may take many years to get it into a publishable shape. Some people never talk about anything unpublished or something that will not surface in a few weeks. I you present an EAE experiment someone could repeat it within 3 weeks for a clinical study it will take months getting the ethics and the study in place, so less risky to show.

    The worst case of pipping to the post I know of was someone got a paper to review, they then quickly repeaedt the work and claimed that they had the same result to published at the same time of the original paper. PSIit was not an MS researcher.

    As you say if you have access to the information they you can make your own mind up what is hot and what is not

    Clinicians can talk more openly because they are unlikely to be pipped...they talk about trials there are not going to be lots of groups doing the same trials. At the moment we have two ibudilast trials going neck and neck but if one finishes and presents, the other trial can not do anything about it as they can't break the code until it is finished. So it boils down to how quick they can recruit.

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  4. The academic world is a great place....you just have to realise that not all of it smells of roses. Often scientists are very collaborative and do this for the greater good

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  5. Is that why team G presented posters of published data?

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