Wednesday, 15 October 2014

Fat and Female increase your risk of MS

Gianfrancesco MA, Acuna B, Shen L, Briggs FB, Quach H, Bellesis KH, Bernstein A, Hedstrom AK, Kockum I, Alfredsson L, Olsson T, Schaefer C, Barcellos LF. Obesity during childhood and adolescence increases susceptibility to multiple sclerosis after accounting for established genetic and environmental risk factors.
Obes Res Clin Pract. 2014 8(5):e435-e447. doi: 10.1016/j.orcp.2014.01.002.

OBJECTIVE: To investigate the association between obesity and multiple sclerosis (MS) while accounting for established genetic and environmental risk factors.
METHODS: Participants included members of Kaiser Permanente Medical Care Plan, Northern California Region (KPNC) (1235 MS cases and 697 controls). Logistic regression models were used to estimate odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (95% CI). Body mass index (BMI) or body size was the primary predictor of each model. Both incident and prevalent MS cases were studied.
RESULTS:In analyses stratified by gender, being overweight at ages 10 and 20 were associated with MS in females (p<0.01). Estimates trended in the same direction for males, but were not significant. BMI in 20s demonstrated a linear relationship with MS (p-trend=9.60×10(-4)), and a twofold risk of MS for females with a BMI≥30kg/m(2) was observed (OR=2.15, 95% CI 1.18, 3.92). Significant associations between BMI in 20s and MS in males were not observed. Multivariate modelling demonstrated that significant associations between BMI or body size with MS in females persisted after adjusting for history of infectious mononucleosis and genetic risk factors, including HLA-DRB1*15:01 and established non-HLA risk alleles.
INTERPRETATION:Results show that childhood and adolescence obesity confer increased risk of MS in females beyond established heritable and environmental risk factors. Strong evidence for a dose-effect of BMI in 20s and MS was observed. The magnitude of BMI association with MS is as large as other known MS risk factors.

I guess you are getting a bit fed up with these risk posts and MS. This suggests that if you are overweight in your twenties and female you have twice the risk of getting MS,but this does not happen in males. Obviously, if you are overweight it puts you at risk at risk of all sorts of things. I should know this also being "size-lard:-)"  No need to post that you were a slim thing and got MS as ever these are risk factors and nothing is absolute.

1 comment:

  1. I don't know anyone diagnosed with MS that were overweight let alone obese. It needs to include information of what they are eating. Could be an ingredient that is toxic. They are probably fat because they find it difficult to exercise. Also, North California a small area to research.

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