Sunday, 15 March 2015

Mice to Men...can't even do mice toMonkey

Chen Z, Chen JT, Johnson M, Gossman ZC, Hendrickson M, Sakaie K, Martinez-Rubio C, Gale JT, Trapp BD. Ann Clin Transl Neurol. 2015 Feb;2(2):208-13. Cuprizone does not induce CNS demyelination in nonhuman primates.

Cognitive decline is a common symptom in multiple sclerosis patients, with profound effects on the quality of life. A nonhuman primate model ofmultiple sclerosis would be best suited to test the effects of demyelination on complex cognitive functions such as learning and reasoning. Cuprizone has been shown to reliably induce brain demyelination in mice. To establish a non=human primate model of multiple sclerosis, young adult cynomolgus monkeys were administered cuprizone per os as a dietary supplement. The subjects received increasing cuprizone doses (0.3-3% of diet) for up to 18 weeks. Magnetic resonance imaging and immunohistological analyses did not reveal demyelination in these monkeys.

Feed cuprizone to a rodents and they can gets demyelination in a few places and this model is increasing been used as a model to assess remyelinating therapies. However in monkeys it did not do anything, So this is not going to bridge the gap between mouse and humans. Is this needed?

10 comments:

  1. Mice and humans are very different. Do monkeys demyelinate when they have weeks of ongoing severe stress?

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  2. MouseDoc, the press is going mental this weekend over the dangers of vit (http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/health/news/11471518/Too-much-sunshine-could-lead-to-increased-risk-of-heart-attacks-and-strokes.html).

    We deserve some analysis and clarity from you on this matter. The study is the largest of its kind and contradicts much of your viewpoints.

    Answers, please.

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    1. I saw this Danish Study some days ago, and I will leave this or ProfG to comment on as this is his baby and not mine...my view point is that vit D it is a nutriceutical

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  3. NO, it is not needed. I am not a mouse with PPMS, nor am I a monkey with PPMS. (No disrespect to either species intended.)

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  4. Maybe the monkeys were too young? Mice age faster :-)

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  5. I wish Team G would stop monkeying around. Poor research news day - urine and monkeys! We need some good news soon - as promised by MD2. MD2 gives me hope. We need more researches like him / her. prof G is ok, but way too much and in a permanent state of jet lag. Bid MD too focused on cannaboids. cOME ON team G - time for some good research news.

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    1. Well if the good research news is published we can pass this on to you, sorry it was a boring day for you. MD2 will be back next week spreading a little joy.

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    2. And here I am to share the joy with you good people.

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  6. While we're on subject of messing around
    Why have we not had any better ideas regards to dates for the results of the original Charcot project? Also why are you guys playing it down so much? Surely by now you'd have some idea as to how it's going?

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    Replies
    1. The data has to be locked-down so it can't be changed before it can be analysed and then the paper has to be written and published, we have no idea of this date yet. Maybe the beans will be spilled at a meeting e.g. ECTRIMS 2015. If you are hoping for a sneak preview of the result before then I would not hold your breathe...sorry.

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