Thursday, 9 July 2015

Driving in MS


Ranchet M, Akinwuntan A, Tant M, Neal E, Devos H. Agreement between physician's recommendation and fitness-to-drive decision in multiple sclerosis.Arch Phys Med Rehabil. 2015 Jul 1. pii: S0003-9993(15)00490-6. doi: 10.1016/j.apmr.2015.06.010. [Epub ahead of print]

OBJECTIVES:To investigate the agreement of fitness-to-drive decisions made by the referring physician and by the on-road assessor in individuals with multiple sclerosis (iwMS).
PARTICIPANTS:A sample of iwMS (N = 218) who completed the medical and driving questionnaire and performed an official on-road test.
RESULTS:The referring physician and on-road assessor agreed on the fitness-to-drive in 191 (88%) of the cases (p < 0.0001). When compared to the on-road assessor's judgments, the physician's recommendation of fitness-to-drive was overestimated in 16 iwMS and underestimated in 11 iwMS. Patients with poor binocular acuity were more likely to be inaccurately classified by the physician (p = 0.001).
CONCLUSIONS:This study showed a high level of agreement between the fitness-to-drive decisions made by physicians and on-road assessors in iwMS. Visual functions should be assessed in the doctor's office for more accurate referrals.

You doc is not a bad judge of your capability to drive safety, but ensure you have your eyes are checked out.

8 comments:

  1. I believe it should be compulsory for anyone with MS to have their eyes checked every 6 months.

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    1. I don't' agree - not everyone who has MS has problems with their eyes. However, part of any review appointments with MS clinicians should include questioning the patient about their eyes/vision and conducting a basic GP type eye test if the clinicians thinks that it is necessary.

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    2. Sorry, but most people don't realise there is anything wrong with their eyes until they're checked by an optician. Bi-annual check ups are a small price to pay for not having a road accident. GPs don't have the equipment to do proper checks. It's not just about reading a chart.

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    3. I don't agree with Anon 12:37. I've had PPMS for at least 15 years and have never had eyesight issues. But I think it should be a requirement for ALL drivers to have their eyesight tested every year.

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    4. So you've obviously had regular eyesight checks over the past 15 years so you are legal to drive. Many don't.

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    5. "Many don't"
      Gosh anony 6.18, really, how shockingly irresponsible of them;) I'd be very interested in seeing you stats to back this assertion up. It does surprise me.

      PS:, I have an eye test every time I see my neurologist and visit my opticians every 6 months as I'm long-sighted, even though I don't drive. I don't particularly like not being able to see well (surprises me that anyone does) so wear glasses.

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  2. This is another reason to preserve upper limb function. Autos can be driven with hand controls. If mobility and upper limb function are lost then independence is compromised.

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  3. Had my second cataract op on Friday. It's also solved my problem with high myopia. It won't make my retina thicker, but my terrible problem with balance has improved overnight. Thank you Moorfields.

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