Tuesday, 23 February 2016

MS in the USA

Dilokthornsakul P, Valuck RJ, Nair KV, Corboy JR, Allen RR, Campbell JD.Multiple sclerosis prevalence in the United States commercially insured population.Neurology. 2016 . pii: 10.1212/WNL.0000000000002469. [Epub ahead of print]

OBJECTIVE:To estimate the US commercially insured multiple sclerosis (MS) annual prevalence from 2008 to 2012.
METHODS:The study was a retrospective analysis using PharMetrics Plus, a nationwide claims database for over 42 million covered US representative lives. Annual point prevalence required insurance eligibility during an entire year. Our primary annual MS identification algorithm required 2 inpatient claims coded ICD-9 340 or 3 outpatient claims coded ICD-9 340 or 1 MS-indicated disease-modifying therapy claim. Age-adjusted annual prevalence estimates were extrapolated to the US population using US Census data.
RESULTS:The 2012 MS prevalence was 149.2 per 100,000 individuals (95% confidence interval 147.6-150.9). Prevalence was consistent over 2008-2012. Female participants were 3.13 times more likely to have MS. The highest prevalence was in participants aged 45-49 years (303.5 per 100,000 individuals [295.6-311.5]). The East Census region recorded the highest prevalence (192.1 [188.2-196.0]); the West Census region recorded the lowest prevalence (110.7 [105.5-116.0]). The US annual 2012 MS extrapolated population was 403,630 (387,445-419,833).
CONCLUSIONS: MS prevalence rates from a representative commercially insured database were higher than or consistent with prior US estimates. For further accuracy improvement of US prevalence estimates, results should be confirmed after validation of MS identification algorithms, and should be expanded to other US populations, including the government-insured and the uninsured.

You may be interested in this figure with estimated 400,000 people in USA with MS.

3 comments:

  1. Funny on this. The NIH (director) had a CHAT today on twitter (#nihchat as I recall) which unfortunately I appear to have came at the end of the show re: Rare Diseases.

    From what I'd read elsewhere the 400,000 was based on data from the last century. Interestingly MS appears to no longer know it is supposed to be North of the equator in the US as well. A neurologist at an event we attended earlier today stated to the audience that risks of MS in the USA appear to be based in the first 15 years of life and where one was born in as far as geographic prose. I've not heard this before.

    Way when back I'd stated that in our region there were some 20,000 cases of MS. Not long back I found the figure for Western NY was in the area of 17,000 cases. I've not been able to pin down a number across Lake Ontario towards Toronto Ontario Canada. When one considers 17,000 cases in just this region that represents a significant proportion of 400,000.

    In the same frame of mind, our region, Rochester NY is one of less than a handful of hotspots the US National MS Society ever listed.

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    Replies
    1. "A neurologist at an event we attended earlier today stated to the audience that risks of MS in the USA appear to be based in the first 15 years of life and where one was born in as far as geographic prose. I've not heard this before."
      This is well known, if you move to a new country as a child, you're risk of MS is that of the country you move to ie if you were a child living near the equator (low risk/incidence) and then moved to Scotland (high risk/incidence)your chances of developing MS would be increased, wheras if you move after the age of 15 or so you keep the risk of the country you moved from. Obviously pointing to an environmental factor in the development of MS.

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