Monday, 23 January 2017

#ClinicSpeak & #BrainHealth: are you a weekend warrior?

Time to pack away the feelings of self-loathing and guilt; just do it! #ClinicSpeak #BrainHealth #WeekendWarrior

Self-loathing and guilt are some of the emotions that people experience when their New Year's resolutions turn out to be wishful thinking or you don't seem to find the time in the week to exercise. The good news is that if you are a 'Weekend Warrior' it may be good enough. Weekend Warriors are people who cram their exercise into 1 or 2 sessions on the weekend. 


The study below shows that physical activity patterns characterised by 1 or 2 sessions per week may be sufficient to reduce all-cause, cardiovascular disease (CVD) and cancer mortality risks regardless of adherence to prevailing physical activity guidelines. This is likely to apply to cognitive impairment as well due to the strong association between dementia and CVD. I would be interested to know how many of you are 'Weekend Warriors' or 'Couch Potatoes'?


O’Donovan et al. Association of “Weekend Warrior” and Other Leisure Time Physical Activity Patterns With Risks for All-Cause, Cardiovascular Disease, and Cancer Mortality.  JAMA Intern Med. Published online January 9, 2017. doi:10.1001/jamainternmed.2016.8014

Importance:  More research is required to clarify the association between physical activity and health in “weekend warriors” who perform all their exercise in 1 or 2 sessions per week.

Objective:  To investigate associations between the weekend warrior and other physical activity patterns and the risks for all-cause, cardiovascular disease (CVD), and cancer mortality.

Design, Setting, and Participants:  This pooled analysis of household-based surveillance studies included 11 cohorts of respondents to the Health Survey for England and Scottish Health Survey with prospective linkage to mortality records. Respondents 40 years or older were included in the analysis. Data were collected from 1994 to 2012 and analyzed in 2016.

Exposures:  Self-reported leisure time physical activity, with activity patterns defined as inactive (reporting no moderate- or vigorous-intensity activities), insufficiently active (reporting <150 min/wk in moderate-intensity and <75 min/wk in vigorous-intensity activities), weekend warrior (reporting ≥150 min/wk in moderate-intensity or ≥75 min/wk in vigorous-intensity activities from 1 or 2 sessions), and regularly active (reporting ≥150 min/wk in moderate-intensity or ≥75 min/wk in vigorous-intensity activities from ≥3 sessions). The insufficiently active participants were also characterized by physical activity frequency.

Main Outcomes and Measures:  All-cause, CVD, and cancer mortality ascertained from death certificates.

Results:  Among the 63 591 adult respondents (45.9% male; 44.1% female; mean [SD] age, 58.6 [11.9] years), 8802 deaths from all causes, 2780 deaths from CVD, and 2526 from cancer occurred during 561 159 person-years of follow-up. Compared with the inactive participants, the hazard ratio (HR) for all-cause mortality was 0.66 (95% CI, 0.62-0.72) in insufficiently active participants who reported 1 to 2 sessions per week, 0.70 (95% CI, 0.60-0.82) in weekend warrior participants, and 0.65 (95% CI, 0.58-0.73) in regularly active participants. Compared with the inactive participants, the HR for CVD mortality was 0.60 (95% CI, 0.52-0.69) in insufficiently active participants who reported 1 or 2 sessions per week, 0.60 (95% CI, 0.45-0.82) in weekend warrior participants, and 0.59 (95% CI, 0.48-0.73) in regularly active participants. Compared with the inactive participants, the HR for cancer mortality was 0.83 (95% CI, 0.73-0.94) in insufficiently active participants who reported 1 or 2 sessions per week, 0.82 (95% CI, 0.63-1.06) in weekend warrior participants, and 0.79 (95% CI, 0.66-0.94) in regularly active participants.

Conclusions and Relevance:  Weekend warrior and other leisure time physical activity patterns characterized by 1 or 2 sessions per week may be sufficient to reduce all-cause, CVD, and cancer mortality risks regardless of adherence to prevailing physical activity guidelines.

5 comments:

  1. Prof G how many exercise sessions did you manage last week?

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    Replies
    1. Yep, Prof G, second that question.
      Especially after yours summer olympic challenge we would like to see your selfies on the pistes or running trails at least!
      (can borrow you a gopro for that ;)

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    2. Three sessions; (1) 10km row (Monday), (2) 14km row (Saturday) and (3) 10km run (Sunday). I am bordering on being a Weekend Warrior. In addition, my hip make running more than 2x per week difficult.

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    3. Perfectly respectable for someone working long hours, don't be down on yourself ;-)

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  2. I don't think this post is appropriate or helpful for people like me with progressive MS and mobility difficulties. My physiotherapist advised me to exercise in short bursts due to fatigue. I am very active despite my disabilities and an ideal weight for my height. I love being active outdoors in particular, but exercise according to my body's needs and for my wellbeing, not according to some timetable or to fulfill someone else's ill-informed expectations.

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