Wednesday, 25 January 2017

Is ProfG making us go fishing?

ProfG's highlight of the month in MSARDS
               was EAE in Zebra fish (click here for a free copy)

                                 
I thought I would add more    
       There's a video of EAE in fish....not for the faint hearted 

video
The fish will die, so one needs to put in endpoints,before the paralysis

Why a highlight
Is prof G trying to get rid of Me?
He even asked if I have got the fish tanks yet:-(
                            

FishDoctor,
Should we be investing in this area? 
Can I afford it?, Can I afford to Ignore it?                  
                            
I guess the Home Orifice 
is getting their wellies out, ready to make the mousers
go fishing.
                                                                                 
What do you think?........Dr. Doox?

Will it be Fish & Mice...an add-on or an instead of?

6 comments:

  1. I'm surprised no ones tried this before? Or have they but they couldn't get it right?

    Is it ZF that are super regenerative? Can't they rebuild their hearts scar free? Wouldn't this have implications for studying scarring of the nervous system in that model? Or would this be a positive because of the potential to look at neuro-regeneration?

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  2. Is MouseDoc is taking the P***?

    I chose this article as my Editor's choice simply because of its novelty and the fact that it challenges a lot of assumptions. The Editor's choice also makes the article open-access so anyone can download it for free. This is important. Science is about reproducibility.

    Reproducibility is the ability of an entire experiment or study to be duplicated, either by the same researcher or by someone else working independently. Reproducing an experiment is called replicating it. Reproducibility is one of the main principles of the scientific method.

    By making this article open access I am hoping that other researchers in the field take up the challenge and try and reproduce these results. ##

    May be MouseDoctor should buy a fish tank. Does the home office have rules for fish? If no then it may be easier to test hypotheses in the future.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes the Home Office has rules for use of fish, just as we have rules for
      other vertebrate and some non vertebrate animals covered by the Animals Act

      https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/389817/44389_unact_animals_Fish_Amphibians_Reptiles_and_Cephalopod.pdf

      Delete
  3. Spare a thought for the MDs in the field of antimicrobial research
    https://www.researchgate.net/publication/221805702_Utility_of_Greater_Wax_Moth_Larva_Galleria_mellonella_for_Evaluating_the_Toxicity_and_Efficacy_of_New_Antimicrobial_Agents

    ReplyDelete
  4. MD,

    Yes I will rise to the ‘bait’ (excuse the crap pun).
    As a scientist with MS, I find it quite depressing.
    As you well know, a common justification for the creation of yet another animal model is that they will provide, or contribute to, ‘improved’, or more predictive ways of recapitulating the human pathology, but this doesn’t appear to be the motivation for this research. It’s also an oversimplification because a) it doesn’t always turn out that way b) even where a newly generated model is more appropriate, it is most commonly used alongside previous models.
    Unfortunately, there’s no mechanism for ensuring only the most relevant models are used and that newer (& hopefully more refined) models are made available to all researchers where these would genuinely improve scientific quality and/or translatability. So, in the cases when a new animal model is created, is not the new definitive model but just an additional one.
    The motivation for this research appears to be cost and timesaving, rather than improved translatability to the clinic, or any of the 3Rs.
    These fish are all sentient individuals and capable of experiencing pain, suffering and distress - these animals matter - something which is recognised under UK & EU legislation.

    I would be interested to hear your view on the scientific and ethical justification for this research.

    ReplyDelete

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