Welcome to the Barts MS Research Blog

The aim of this Blog is to update you on the latest research in MS and new clinical trends in the field of MS.  

You can search the blog of topics of interest using the SEARCH APP. This will provide you with a list of all relevant posts on a specific topic.


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If you don't understand something or have a question you can either use the comment function or use the jargon bell. Terms entered into the jargon bell are listed in the glossary. 




All posts that are clinically relevant are labelled using the key words Clinic Speak. The following is a good example of a Clinic Speak post; it addresses bladder problems in MSers. 

Clinic speak: why the bladder is so important to MSers.

If you have any ideas or comments on how we can improve the blog please don’t hesitate to contact us; the best way to do this is via email: g.giovannoni@qmul.ac.uk.

7 comments:

  1. Would the "mouse doctor" please reveal who he/she is. It get strange making comments to a mouse.

    ReplyDelete
  2. I am hoping to get support for this. I am a Canadian so the only way I can make pressure to get HSCT recognized and allowed as an optional treatment is to post a change.org petition request.

    If I have any success at all with our newly elected government - then I believe it would put pressure on other countries to follow suit, either out of common sense or national pride, or even a sense of competition - hopefully just out of compassion and realization what an ugly disease this is.

    Canadians believing HSCT should be a patient's option for treatment please sign, and even if you are not Canadian, please sign because if this is successful and our country offers this procedure - other countries will follow.

    Thank you for your support, please feel free to forward link for others to sign.

    HSCT (chemo followed by bone marrow transplant [aka stem cell transplant], has been around for decades for cancer). Please support it being allowed as a recognized option for people with MS.

    How HSCT for MS was first discovered was when people with cancer, who also coincidentally had MS, found that their MS went into remission after the cancer treatment.

    Yes.there is risk with HSCT but there is also risk with approved MS drugs, PML is a deadly brain disease that can occur from taking MS drugs that suppress immunity.

    Many people with MS are suffering because all MS drugs have side effects, some are intolerable, some are even deadly. No MS drug halts MS progression.

    However a large percentage of people have their MS halted when they have HSCT treatment. People with MS should have this option, and be treated with no less care than a cancer patient.

    https://www.change.org/p/info-cahspr-ca-sab-ccs-hc-sc-gc-ca-phecg-secretariat-hc-sc-gc-ca-public-health-agency-of-canada-s-public-health-ethics-consultative-group-phecg-col-maureen-haberstock-jane-philpott-parl-gc-provide-hsct-for-multiple-sclerosis-as-a-recognized-treatment?recruiter=28470825&utm_source=share_petition&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=share_email_responsive&rp_sharecordion_checklist=control

    ReplyDelete
  3. https://www.change.org/p/info-cahspr-ca-sab-ccs-hc-sc-gc-ca-phecg-secretariat-hc-sc-gc-ca-public-health-agency-of-canada-s-public-health-ethics-consultative-group-phecg-col-maureen-haberstock-jane-philpott-parl-gc-provide-hsct-for-multiple-sclerosis-as-a-recognized-treatment?recruiter=28470825&utm_source=share_petition&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=share_email_responsive&rp_sharecordion_checklist=control

    I am hoping to get support for this. I am a Canadian so the only way I can make pressure to get HSCT recognized and allowed as an optional treatment is to post a change.org petition request.
    If I have any success at all with our newly elected government - then I believe it would put pressure on other countries to follow suit, either out of common sense or national pride, or even a sense of competition - hopefully just out of compassion and realization what an ugly disease this is.
    Canadians believing HSCT should be a patient's option for treatment please sign, and even if you are not Canadian, please sign because if this is successful and our country offers this procedure - other countries will follow.

    ReplyDelete
  4. Interested in thoughts by Bart's Team on the recent study regarding Phenytoin and slowing neurodegeneration. Would all the anti-seizure meds like (Carbamazepine, Valproic Acid, Gabapentin, Pregabalin, Lamictal,Topiramate) all work the same by blocking Na channel "toxicity" in neurons thereby preventing neurodegeneration? The side effects in patients secondary to Phenytoin are much more common and severe as compared to the other anti-seizure medications. How long and how many obstacles do you see before this is recommended in all MS patients?

    Also, interested if you can discuss Dr. Sadiq /Tisch Multiple Sclerosis Research Centre in NY, USA entering into phase II trials using autologous raw mesenchymal stem cells and converting them into neural progenitor cells (myelin and nerves?) for repair/regeneration in MS patients. Why is the NMSS not supporting this critical trial with no current effective treatment for SPMS and PPMS? Why so little press? Are there more trials like this in the world ongoing right now-Atkins and Freedman? What am I missing as this trial seems revolutionary in the treatment of all form of MS?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Interested in thoughts by Bart's Team on the recent study regarding Phenytoin and slowing neurodegeneration

      Its ace work, but them the idea was ours and we were involved in the trial:-). However you are correct blocking the sodium channels is targeting a biology that we think is important and so other drugs can do the same thing. In fact the other drugs were much better than phenytoin in their neuroprotective effect. This why we are using oxcarbazepine in the PROXIMUS trial. One can target other parts of the pathway with less side effects, which is the problem with the sodium channel blocking effects. People with MS poorly tolerate these.

      However until there is more proof they work they are not going to become available and I am not sure companies are developing new targets in the sodium channel blockers but Biogen spent 700 million buying a company that makes them.

      Delete
    2. Sadiq study is one of many. I predict they will be safe, but based on animal studies the repair they do will be limited and their immunomodulatory effect will be weak compared to current DMT.

      Why is NMSS not supporting the trial at the tisch I have no idea they may be funding others, there is an international approach on mesenchymal stem cells already. I would say it is best to treat this as hype until it is actuallly shown to work well.

      Delete

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