Thursday, 20 July 2017

psychiatric disorders in children

Psychiatric disorders in children with demyelinating diseases of the central nervous system.Pakpoor J, Goldacre R, Schmierer K, Giovannoni G, Waubant E, Goldacre MJ.
Mult Scler. 2017 Jul 1:1352458517719150. doi: 10.1177/1352458517719150. [Epub ahead of print]

INTRODUCTION:

The profile of psychiatric disorders associated with multiple sclerosis (MS) may differ in children. We aimed to assess the risk of psychiatric disorders in children with MS and other demyelinating diseases, and vice versa.

PATIENTS AND METHODS:

We analyzed linked English Hospital Episode Statistics, and mortality data, 1999-2011. Cohorts were constructed of children admitted with MS and other central nervous system (CNS) demyelinating diseases. We searched for any subsequent episode of care with psychiatric disorders in these cohorts and compared to a reference cohort.

RESULTS:

Children with CNS demyelinating diseases had an increased rate of psychotic disorders (rate ratio (RR) = 5.77 (95% confidence interval (CI) = 2.48-11.41)); anxiety, stress-related, and somatoform disorders (RR = 2.38 (1.39-3.81)); intellectual disability (RR = 6.56 (3.66-10.84)); and other behavioral disorders (RR = 8.99 (5.13-14.62)). In analysis of the paediatric MS cohort as the exposure, there were elevated rates of psychotic disorders (RR = 10.76 (2.93-27.63)), mood disorders (RR = 2.57 (1.03-5.31)), and intellectual disability (RR = 6.08 (1.25-17.80)). In reverse analyses, there were elevated rates of a recorded hospital episode with CNS demyelinating disease after a previous recorded episode with anxiety, stress-related, and somatoform disorders; attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD); autism; intellectual disability; and other behavioral disorders.

CONCLUSION:

This analysis of a national diagnostic database provides strong evidence for an association between pediatric CNS demyelinating diseases and psychiatric disorders, and highlights a need for early involvement of mental health professionals.

Children who get MS are at a 6 times risk of getting psychiatric issues,

3 comments:

  1. I think there are many factors involved in this... biological, social and psychological.

    ReplyDelete
  2. If some of these children take psychiatric medications, many of these medications can cause weight gain.
    Weight gain might not be good for MS.
    The psychiatric medications that can cause weight gain include:
    Clozaril (clozapine)
    Zyprexa (olanzapine)
    Remeron (mirtazapine)
    Seroquel (quetiapine)
    Depakote (divalproex)
    Paxil (paroxetine)

    ReplyDelete

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